Category Archives: sponsor

The Extremely Successful Salesman’s Club

Book: The Extremely Successful Salesman’s Club by Chris Murray

Initially this book looks like it’s going to be just another manual on how to sell with the faint promise and possibility of the reader becoming more successful.

It’s actually presented in a humorous and rather clever fictionalised “Victorian” series of diary entries, it was quite a nice change to read something inspirational and useful in the form of a story.

Continue reading Book: The Extremely Successful Salesman’s Club by Chris Murray

Selling to large organisations – Is the project put on hold? – finding the clients Unique Buying Proposition

Delaying mechanisms – Is your deal killed?

We often agree contracts with large organizations, who have lots of red tape involved in their decision-making processes. Contracts and proposals for collaborations often have to pass through several different departments before they are finally approved: buying / procurement, legal, relevant business units, and then back to procurement again. This bureaucratic route is full of delaying mechanisms that can kill the deal, so we prefer to use a sponsor for such large accounts; someone who believes in our service and is convinced that change is necessary.

Close The Deal: Is it a Priority?

If you are trying to sell a service to an organization in a B-to-B-environment, and you successfully convince and even possibly make your contact enthusiastic about your solution, you can still often find that you don’t hear back from them. What’s happened?

Your contact will have presented your proposal to their colleagues or other managers, and most probably received the following responses: “Yes, that’s probably true”, or “That is indeed interesting, but it’s not a priority”, or “We’re not ready for this”. So the project is put on hold, and often dies a quiet death. After all, there are always more reasons for not changing than there are for changing. This means you don’t receive any commitment, and you cannot close the deal. So it’s important that your contact person can show commitment , in the first place by convincing themselves.

Tip : 

 – Let the Client negotiate with themselves: do I want to change or do I not want to change?

–  Ask questions that gets the client thinking: “How did you get in your current situation? Why is it still being used? Why do you still work like this? Is it still successful?”

This forces the client to think about the reasons why change is necessary. These reasons can be your differentiators! These are the criteria that are important for the client, and where you as seller and supplier can make a difference. We can also call this a Unique Buying Proposition.

The reasons for change can also be very confrontational, and have a great impact on the organization. Your contact will therefore also have to consider how to explain this to their employees, and convince them of the need for change. Your contact becomes a sponsor for your solution.

René Knecht

About René Knecht

René Knecht gained a master’s degree in Commercial Engineering from the Vrije Universiteit Brussel (University of Brussels, Belgium) and quickly excelled in sales. In 1999, he switched to HR consultancy in recruitment and training, which, in 2005, led to the incorporation of his company, ICT-Connecting: a specialist direct search agency for ICT and sales roles. René developed the Differentiation Selling® concept in 2009. The concept is based on best practices in sales, negotiation, change management, conflict management, and interviews with over 1500 sales and account managers since 1999. Differentiation Selling is a method that first makes it possible to negotiate the STATUS QUO. This is a radical break from traditional ideas on selling

The use of Process Oriented Questions in Selling – Selling is a change process

Guide the change process with targeted questions

Compare the following contextual questions …

• “How many employees do you have?” (content, facts & figures)
• “What technology do you use for …?” (facts)

… with this process-oriented questions

• “How did you decide to expand this service?” (process, historical)
• “Under which circumstances do you use this service/technology?” (How does the client decide?)
• “What alternatives are you looking for?” (create a vision)

When they answer process-oriented questions, clients form ideas or visions, challenge/examine assumptions and draw correlations. This gives them time to think, which in turn leads to decisions.

Process-oriented questions create interaction, which turns selling the process into a creative one.
One of the characteristics of  process oriented questions  is that they have unpredictable answers. But there will definitely be a dialogue, an interaction. And the interaction can create the change.

www.differentiationselling.com

Differentiation Selling is  available in English :

DIFFERENTIATION SELLING® – A Practical Guide to Selling Services and Solutions in Competitive Markets

René Knecht

About René Knecht

René Knecht gained a master’s degree in Commercial Engineering from the Vrije Universiteit Brussel (University of Brussels, Belgium) and quickly excelled in sales. In 1999, he switched to HR consultancy in recruitment and training, which, in 2005, led to the incorporation of his company, ICT-Connecting: a specialist direct search agency for ICT and sales roles. René developed the Differentiation Selling® concept in 2009. The concept is based on best practices in sales, negotiation, change management, conflict management, and interviews with over 1500 sales and account managers since 1999. Differentiation Selling is a method that first makes it possible to negotiate the STATUS QUO. This is a radical break from traditional ideas on selling